REVISING YOUR WRITING #3

Quick Note: This is a series of blog posts many of which have ideas that are based off of Plot  & Structure by James Scott Bell. I highly recommend reading this book if you typically have problems with the mechanics of writing (plots, character arcs, subplots, revising, etc.). This book is aimed mostly at fiction novels, but these techniques can be applied to most aspects of writing.


Read Through:

At this point you’ve done everything you can to procrastinate the inevitable read through of your manuscript. You can’t put it off any more, and you wouldn’t want to if you could. I’d love to be able to give you a long post about all the different ways to possibly do this part of the process, but I can’t. The only way to read through your piece is to sit down and do it. I do, however, have a few tips for making the process as quick and as helpful as possible!

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REVISING YOUR WRITING #2

Quick Note: This is a series of blog posts many of which have ideas that are based off of Plot  & Structure by James Scott Bell. I highly recommend reading this book if you typically have problems with the mechanics of writing (plots, character arcs, subplots, revising, etc.). This book is aimed mostly at fiction novels, but these techniques can be applied to most aspects of writing.


Pump Yourself Up:

So it’s been a few weeks,maybe a few months, since you’ve looked at your first draft of your novel. It’s been stewing in a big black pot on the back burner of your thoughts, simmering away until you finally start to think I want to take a peak under that lid.

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REVISING YOUR WRITING #1

Quick Note: I’m about to start revising the novel I wrote during November (NaNoWriMo!), and I have some problems when it comes to revising large pieces. They seem to massive for me to take on, so I’ve been doing research on how to approach it. I decided to make a series of blog posts that all relate to this topic. Many of them will be based off James Scot Bell’s Plot & Structure. I’ll break down the steps he uses to revise a work of fiction into a series of blog posts on the topic, and phrase them in my own words to help me understand each part more. Also, these posts will be geared more toward fiction, but you can use many of the tips to revise creative nonfiction and poetry as well.



Let It Cool:

Imagine you have this volcano in your head that’s bursting with ideas that you want to write about. Bits of plot lines and characters swirl in the magma, hot with excitement for you to write them. One day the volcano erupts and all of these fragments of ideas and characters come together into a massive flow of lava that’s slowly moving down the rocky volcano side and into the surrounding area. The lava looks smooth and red like strawberry taffy in a taffy puller.  A small crust of rock is starting to form on top of the lava, as thin as caramelized sugar on crème brûlée. Off in the distance you see a human, a tiny little creature with an adventurous soul, standing and watching the aftermath of the eruption. Now freeze that image in your mind.

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